7 Things That Can Destroy The Life Of Any Young Man


By Danceville


There are many things that can destroy the life of a young man, hurt their destiny, stop their growth, slow their progress or block their advancement in life.All young men should know this things and avoid them.

1. Living Without Purpose And Vision

A friend of mine once said, “Guys of nowadays love Television buh don’t have Vision “.This is nothing buh the truth.Most guys don’t have vision, aspiration or even a plan for tomorrow.You can’t be the best in any trade if you don’t have anything you’re pursuing.

2. Alcohol And Drug

The use of alcohol and drug is another way young men ruin their lives.When a young man is exposed to drug and alcohol at a very tender age, the effects goes beyond what they ever expect in life, as they easily get inducted into the dark world of crime.

3. Wrong Association

The company a young man walks with, will ultimately determine what he will become.Choose your friends wisely.Some friends are multipliers while some are destroyers.A wise man once said “Show me your friends and I can accurately predict your future.The company you keep determines your accomplishments.

4. Crime

Wrong association and information, leads to drugs and alcohol usage.The resultant effects are crime, gang fights, cultism, armed robbery murder etc. At the end, the law catches up with those young ones and helps them waste many years in the college for stubborn and foolish prison yards.

5. Sexual Immoralities

Lust, fornication, pornography, rape, masturbation etc are all sexual immoralities and serves as a media the devil uses to destroy the life of young men.Don’t expose yourself to them, don’t company with those that are involved in it because it will end up destroying you.

6. Laziness

Hatred of work, oversleeping, indolent lifestyle is dangerous to the life of any single man.A man, I mean a real man should be bold enough to work, he must be a man of the field, planting and harvesting for his future.When a man is a lover of his bed, lazy and lukewarm, there’s no way he will not serve his mates and live in abject poverty and penury throughout is lifetime.

Last buh not the least..

7. Love Of Money

Love of money is a great destroyer of many young men nowadays.Some even results in rituals, that later end up their lives soon.Don’t think without money, you can’t reach that place you desired to be.. And always remember, Vanity Upon Vanity, All Is Vanity.

NB

This thread is meant for everybody.The way young men is destroying their lives in this Society, is appalling.Are you guilty of any of these? Please it isn’t too late to make a CHANGE…

I drop my pen at this Juncture.

Feel free to add yours.

Please share this post among your friends..

You might just SAVE A SOUL..


Written And Compiled By
DanceVille


Please help me to give this thread a wider coverage.A soul might be save through this post.


SebenzaLIVE helps SA’s youth find work

An increasing number of qualified youths are looking for jobs in South Africa but have no luck finding any because of their lack of confidence or experience, or because they do not know where to find the right business opportunities.

SebenzaLIVE, now part of the SowetanLIVE website, is all about giving these youths a career kick-start by helping them present themselves better and achieve their goals.

Being informed is the key to success, so we will publish practical advice about employment; lifestyle and fashion tips for the young person who has just started working or is looking for a job; and even helpful information about starting or managing a small business.

We’re here for high school pupils; students enrolled at higher education and training institutions; graduates; unemployed youths; and small-business owners or entrepreneurs.

We will share practical information on internships, learnerships, bursaries, apprenticeships and small-business programmes and events organised by government departments and agencies, companies and corporate foundations.

You’ll also find features about the work lives of young people from different industries, to illustrate how they overcame obstacles in their own lives to pursue their dreams.

Source: Sowetan

Nigeria: NAFOWA to empower unemployed women, youths in Abuja

By Jerrywright Ukwu

NAFOWA is set to empower another batch of 220 unemployed women and youths

The association commenced the 10th edition of its skills acquisition and vocational training programme in Abuja

The 10-week programme will provide participants with needed knowledge and practical skills in vocational areas

The Nigerian Air Force Officers’ Wives Association (NAFOWA) has commenced the 10th edition of its skills acquisition and vocational training programme in Abuja.

The 10-week programme, which commenced on Saturday, November 3, at the Nigerian Air Force (NAF) Base Abuja will provide participants with needed knowledge and practical skills in vocational areas such as tailoring, catering, hairdressing and barbing, makeup artistry, computer appreciation as well as photography and videography.

Other areas are satellite cable installation, event decoration, interior decoration and soft furnishing, soap and disinfectant production, leather shoes and bags production as well as aluminum works fabrication.

Legit.ng gathered that 220 unemployed women and youths will benefit from the skills acquisition programme which is in tandem with the association’s resolve to complement the efforts of the Federal Government in curbing youth restiveness through the provision of employment opportunities.

Speaking during the flag off ceremony, the NAFOWA national president, Hajiya Hafsat Sadique Abubakar, reiterated the commitment of the association to contribute to the socio-economic wellbeing of women and children in the society.

According to her, the commencement of the 10th edition of the programme in Abuja was a testimony to the readiness of the association to discourage any form of idleness and social vices among youths.

Her words: “We have come to commence the biggest training so far, we are ready to add another group of two hundred and twenty aspiring youths, women and widows into our skill acquisition hall of fame.

“It has long been in our plan to bring this initiative to Abuja knowing fully well that despite being a cosmopolitan city, Abuja is not spared from the problem of unemployment and the NAF Base Abuja despite being an accommodating base still has the same demographics which has always attracted NAFOWA, that is women, youths and widows.

“We know many people in this environment are in need of this empowerment intervention as the problem of unemployment, idleness and underemployment is really not selective of its location.

“Hence, the participants of this 10th edition have been carefully selected from all the Bases in Abuja that house Nigerian Air Force Personnel and their surrounding communities.

“We have identified women, youths and widows who are in need of our support through a program like this and who are willing and ready to change their stories.

“We have not only paid attention to the dependants of NAF personnel but we have also included our host communities who have been graciously accommodating us all these years as we all know the Nigerian Air Force and also NAFOWA pays special attention to a good civil military relationship.”

Earlier in her welcome address, the NAFOWA coordinator, Abuja chapter, Hajiya Rabiat Yusuf, revealed that the participants of the 10th edition of the programme were carefully selected from all the NAF Bases in Abuja and their host communities.

She also thanked the association for its continuous drive towards empowering the vulnerable in the society.

NAFOWA has graduated over 2,000 women and youths from its skills acquisition and vocational training programme in just over 2 years.

Meanwhile, in continuation of efforts at empowering dependants of personnel in productive ventures, the Nigerian Air Force (NAF), recently flagged off the new farming season at 107 Air Maritime Group (107 AMG), Benin.

The farming scheme is part of the BYETA initiated in 2016 by the Chief of the Air Staff (CAS), Air Marshal Sadique Abubakar, as part of efforts at empowering barracks youths in all NAF bases across the country, by training them in different aspects of agriculture towards positively engaging them in productive ventures.

NAIJ.com (naija.ng) -> Legit.ng We keep evolving to serve our readers better.

Nigerian Air Force Day Celebration 2018 (54th Anniversary) | Legit.ng TV

Source: Legit.ng

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How can young people secure a better future for Africa?

By Gerald Chirinda

With 70% of Africa’s population under the age of 30, we as a continent are presented with a great opportunity and, possibly, a great challenge. Young Africans today are taking actions that not only have an immediate impact, but will also determine the future of the continent for decades to come.

Never has there been such weighty responsibility on the shoulders of young people. Never has there been the influence in the hands of young people like the influence they carry now. But for Africa to reap the dividends she has longed for, it is up to our generation to make sure that influence is channelled correctly and directed towards relevant issues that affect not only ourselves, but generations after us. This can only be achieved if we come together as young people and begin to address the challenges before us as a continent.

The role of African youth is drastically changing, but so are some of the challenges we face, such as employability and entrepreneurship opportunities. The strength of any society is within the strength and resolve of its youth – what investment are young people making in our continent today?

In the past 6 months, I’ve listened to the argument stating that we have spent more time focused on what’s happening in other continents, like the US presidency, and less on local issues. I have had the privilege of being invited to speak at different platforms across Africa and have met and engaged with fellow young people who know less about my country Zimbabwe but more of what’s happening in the US and in Europe, and these discussions brought us to a conclusion that as a continent we have not done a good job in telling our own stories, both good and bad, affecting our people. (Could you tell us a bit about your background here – in what capacity are you listening to these arguments?) There are important matters such as the thousands of lives of fellow Africans lost at sea when trying to leave the continent for greener pastures, youth unemployment, gross mismanagement of government institutions and resources, xenophobia among our own people and the general restlessness and frustrations of young African people.

There’s no problem with us engaging in discourse at a global level, but I feel it is important for us to exert more of our time and energy on issues that affect our continent and our people. I believe if we, as youth, don’t take ownership and responsibility for our problems and challenges, we run the risk of allowing other nations, organizations and institutions to do so on their terms. My question to fellow young Africans is are we creating a future in which generations after us can be confident?

A lot has been said about Africa and its rise in the past few years. For this to be true, I believe it requires its people to also rise and drive the agenda, not wait for instruction or direction from other nations. If this doesn’t happen, Africa may still rise, but only for those with an agenda for the continent. This then begs me the question of fellow young Africans: what is our agenda, and what are we doing to shape that agenda?

With regard to employability, according to the African Development Bank report, by 2050 Africa will be home to 38 of the 40 youngest countries in the world, with median populations under 25 years of age. This will result in an estimated 10-12 millionnew people joining the labour force each year. These statistics clearly indicate that a considerable amount of investment must go into human development to unlock a demographic dividend. What innovative policies and programmes do we, as young people, want to make sure that this happens and that this growth will not result in a demographic time bomb for Africa?

With the Fourth Industrial Revolution upon us and the rate at which technology is advancing it is critical that we have a sufficiently educated and skilled workforce to be able to drive Africa in this direction. There is currently a mismatch between industry demands and the education curriculum. Education institutions need to update their curricula to align with the direction in which the world and Africa are going. If we ignore this, our young people will have irrelevant qualifications that the continent will be unable to benefit from.

It is worrying to note the rate at which young educated Africans are leaving to seek more opportunities abroad. The grass is not always greener on the other side, however, as leaders of other nations are also facing domestic challenges and therefore not prioritizing immigrants. If our educational institutions can include entrepreneurship as a mandatory subject at all levels of education, more young people will be better equipped to create jobs and address the issue of high unemployment.

I am a strong advocate for local solutions to local challenges, but for this to happen, we need to encourage and cultivate innovation among our youth. It is encouraging to note that there are pockets of this already taking place across the continent, where we can see uptake and use of locally-designed technology. More of this needs to happen across the board, covering the different sectors of our economies, as Africa still lags behind the rest of the world when it comes to introducing disruptive technology. Human development is about creating opportunities and building a person’s ability to innovate and be entrepreneurial. Significant investment needs to go towards this.

With the growth of the continent, it only makes sense for us to industrialize in order to be less reliant on importing products for consumption from outside the continent. According to the African Economic Outlook 2017 report, Africa’s growing population is expected to generate a rise in consumer spending from $680 billion in 2008 to $2.2 trillion in 2030. This increased spending has the potential to lead to greater prosperity.

The growth in Africa’s population presents a huge opportunity for entrepreneurial innovations and ideas to be implemented. It does, however, require strong political will to enable the right environment to be created to encourage these ideas and for entrepreneurs to be supported in their different stages of growth, from start-up, early stage and growth stage right through to becoming large corporations.

As you may notice, this article asks more questions than it provides solutions. The best way for us to answer these is if we begin to engage in conversations and dialogue amongst ourselves as young Africans and see what solutions we can come up with for a better Africa. We spend time complaining about poor leadership in our countries, but my final question is: are we ourselves prepared to succeed the generation that precedes us?

Let us intentionally create a culture that encourages the building and shaping of the Africa that we want. The change we want begins with us coming together and developing our own culture and value system for thinking, planning, implementation, accountability, integrity and collaboration. It is up to us as young Africans to shape the narrative of our continent. Let us begin to do so, in every sphere of society.

Source: World Economic Forum

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Uganda: Shungura Foundation Boss Urges Gov’t to Involve Youth in Policy Formulation

By Kampala Post Reporter

The Chief Executive Officer Shungura Foundation, Joan Kyokutamba has urged government to involve young people in designing and implementing policies, programs and services that are directed at them.

Kyokutamba made the call while addressing participants at the Public Health Youth Symposium organized by Public Health Ambassadors Uganda (PHAU) at Hotel Africana on Thursday.

Reflecting on the Youth Livelihood Fund (YLF), Kyokutamba said the project needs to be revised to incorporate youth program officers short of which it will not achieve its intended goals.

“Youth involvement helps ensure that policy actions are relevant and also helps develop youth as partners and leaders in development. It is important that youth are viewed as assets and active agents of change, who can contribute their thoughts to the country’s development,” Kyokutamba said.

Acknowledging the importance of engaging youth in shaping the country’s future, Kyokutamba noted that there is also need to involve the private sector in key unemployment interventions.

“By considering ways to translate the potential and enthusiasm of the young generation into assets for positive advancement and development, then Uganda will be on a steady roadmap to achieving the 2040 vision,” Kyokutamba added.

In his address, Richard Ssempala, a Health Economist at Makerere School of Public Health described the symposium as “a unique and timely initiative”. “This symposium brings unique values because we won’t only discuss the problems affecting the youth but also reflect together on solutions coming from young people who represent a big part of the society,” Ssempala said.

Hope Nzeire, the Senior National Program Officer National Population council said that sustainable development and economic growth as a promise of a demographic dividend can only be achieved by implementing new, forward-looking strategies that promote youth engagement, inclusion and representation socially, economically and politically.

“For a demographic dividend to occur, a window of opportunity created by reductions in infant mortality and sustainable fertility rates through enhanced use of contraception directly translates into a demographic shift to fewer dependents that can be comfortably taken care of by the working age population. This way we can get to reverse the pyramid shape of our population with more productivity that will turn around the fortunes of our economy as a country,” she noted.

The symposium, organized under the theme “Working Towards Sustainable Development: Harnessing the Demographic Dividend Through Investing in Uganda’s Youth”, brought together public health professionals, researchers, advocates and young people

Source: Kampala

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Uganda: Shungura Foundation Boss Urges Gov’t to Involve Youth in Policy Formulation

By Kampala Post Reporter

The Chief Executive Officer Shungura Foundation, Joan Kyokutamba has urged government to involve young people in designing and implementing policies, programs and services that are directed at them.

Kyokutamba made the call while addressing participants at the Public Health Youth Symposium organized by Public Health Ambassadors Uganda (PHAU) at Hotel Africana on Thursday.

Reflecting on the Youth Livelihood Fund (YLF), Kyokutamba said the project needs to be revised to incorporate youth program officers short of which it will not achieve its intended goals.

“Youth involvement helps ensure that policy actions are relevant and also helps develop youth as partners and leaders in development. It is important that youth are viewed as assets and active agents of change, who can contribute their thoughts to the country’s development,” Kyokutamba said.

Acknowledging the importance of engaging youth in shaping the country’s future, Kyokutamba noted that there is also need to involve the private sector in key unemployment interventions.

“By considering ways to translate the potential and enthusiasm of the young generation into assets for positive advancement and development, then Uganda will be on a steady roadmap to achieving the 2040 vision,” Kyokutamba added.

In his address, Richard Ssempala, a Health Economist at Makerere School of Public Health described the symposium as “a unique and timely initiative”. “This symposium brings unique values because we won’t only discuss the problems affecting the youth but also reflect together on solutions coming from young people who represent a big part of the society,” Ssempala said.

Hope Nzeire, the Senior National Program Officer National Population council said that sustainable development and economic growth as a promise of a demographic dividend can only be achieved by implementing new, forward-looking strategies that promote youth engagement, inclusion and representation socially, economically and politically.

“For a demographic dividend to occur, a window of opportunity created by reductions in infant mortality and sustainable fertility rates through enhanced use of contraception directly translates into a demographic shift to fewer dependents that can be comfortably taken care of by the working age population. This way we can get to reverse the pyramid shape of our population with more productivity that will turn around the fortunes of our economy as a country,” she noted.

The symposium, organized under the theme “Working Towards Sustainable Development: Harnessing the Demographic Dividend Through Investing in Uganda’s Youth”, brought together public health professionals, researchers, advocates and young people

Source: Kampala

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Act now or a billion young Africans will be undone by 2050 – Mandela widow

By Karen McVeigh

Nelson Mandela’s widow has warned Africa could become the continent of a billion “angry, underfed, under-educated and under-employed” young people by 2050, unless African governments act to invest in their children.

In advance of the publication of a major report on child rights across Africa, Graça Machel has expressed concern that a “toxic combination” of undernutrition, poor education and the world’s fastest-growing youth populations pose a threat to the continent’s future.

“Even though our youth have the potential to transform Africa, if neglected, they could exacerbate poverty and inequality while threatening peace, security and prosperity,” said Machel, chair of the international board of trustees of the African Child Policy Forum (ACPF), which will publish the 2018 Africa Report on Child Wellness on Friday.

The report, which ranks 52 nations on how they are meeting child rights under international conventions, warns that massive investment is needed to prevent a billion children and young people from becoming undernourished, semi-illiterate or illiterate, and jobless or underemployed by 2050. Africa’s child and youth population is predicted to reach 750 million by 2030, and one billion by the middle of the century – representing approximately 40% of the global child and youth population.

The ACPF report, which analysed progress on the “child-friendliness” index of African governments over the past decade, highlighted “remarkable improvements” in the survival and overall wellbeing of African children. These included an almost 50% reduction in child mortality over 15 years and increased access to primary education. But the study expressed concern that child malnutrition and substandard education in many counties was creating a “crisis” in human development for the future.

“Africa is on the verge of a serious human development crisis, which carries grave consequences for the social and economic wellbeing of its people and for the future of the continent,” said the report’s authors.

“There are many reasons for concern,” said Dr Assefa Bequele, the ACPF’s executive director. “Undernutrition remains a serious and persistent problem. It is the single biggest challenge for Africa’s children. Stunting remains unacceptably high, at 30.4%. Up to half of all deaths in under-fives are associated with undernutrition. And while African children may attend school in large numbers, they are not learning. Two in every five children leave primary school without learning how to read, write or do simple arithmetic.”

The report named the 11 most child-friendly governments as Mauritius, Algeria, Tunisia, South Africa, Cabo Verde, Egypt, Namibia, Seychelles, Swaziland, Morocco and Lesotho.

South Sudan, Central African Republic, Chad, Cameroon, Zambia, Liberia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea and Eritrea were rated the least child-friendly countries.

Rankings are based on indicators including nutrition, education, budgets and social protection.

Spending on education across Africa has stagnated at an average of 4% of GDP over the past two decades, the study found. More than half of all girls do not attend secondary school. Zambia and Central African Republic allocated just 1% of GDP to education, while Lesotho and Botswana spent more than 10%.

Child undernutrition cost Ethiopia 16.5% of its GDP – and 5.6% in Uganda – said the report.

The study found that while many countries have laws, policies and institutions governing child rights, many laws are discriminatory and inconsistent with international standards. The continuing incidence of child labour, child marriage and violence against children showed a wide gap between rhetoric and action, as well as poor enforcement of laws.

For instance, while 36 out of 52 countries set the marriageable age at 18 or above for both sexes, three in 10 African children are married before the age of 18. In Sudan, girls as young as 10 are allowed to marry.

The report’s authors called for urgent action to tackle undernutrition and poor education, as well as more job creation and greater economic opportunities for young people.

Source: The Guardian

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End exclusion of youth, if we want a better tomorrow

By Aimee Manimani Nsimire

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa—“Sexual assault and embarrassment are the risks that adolescent girls face when dealing with menstruation hygiene in emergency settings, due to the lack of separation between male and female sanitation facilities.”

“Our governments should start viewing us as an asset and not a liability.” – Palesa Lefojane, United Nations Youth Advisory Panel member, Lesotho.

“In an emergency setting, no one thinks of adolescent sexual and reproductive health and rights as one of the priorities,” said Palesa Lefojane, a member of the United Nations Youth Advisory Panel in Lesotho.

“Times of exclusion should be over if ever we want a better tomorrow. Our governments should start viewing us as an asset and not a liability.”

She was speaking at a three-day workshop to equip youth representatives from eight southern African countries with knowledge and skills on youth participation in humanitarian contexts, and peace and security.

Adolescent girls at double disadvantage in emergencies

Emergencies heighten the risks and worsen the vulnerabilities of young people. In particular, adolescent girls – who are often already at a disadvantage due to gender discrimination – must overcome not only the crisis itself, but also potential abuse, violence and exploitation, which can compromise their development, violate their rights and undermine their future and the future of their country.

In spite of all these challenges, young people including adolescents can be extremely resilient and resourceful. Their dynamism and energy are assets that make them active and important agents of positive change, who are able to drive peace and security in their communities.

In East and Southern Africa, the risk of emergencies is high. Eleven out of 23 countries – Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Mozambique, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda – are at high to very high risk of a humanitarian emergency (INFORM Index 2017).

Because a relatively high proportion of the population in the region consists of young people, they stand to make a substantial contribution during emergencies.

About 40 per cent of the 1.4 billion people living in countries impacted by crises globally are under the age of 15. Adolescents aged 10 to 19 years make up a significant proportion of the population in many conflict and post-conflict settings.

“Youth a critical component in peace building”

“I will be sharing this knowledge with youth groups that deal with sexual and reproduction health and rights, and other key populations.”

Protecting and addressing the rights and needs of young people, including adolescents, and engaging them in their unique capacities, is vital in humanitarian preparedness, response and recovery. Creating a strategic youth engagement plan is essential to involve and empower youth in the implementation of humanitarian preparedness and response mechanisms.

“The workshop was an eye opener for me because I learned how youth are a critical component in peace building. It is imperative to include us in all the stages of peace building and promotion, as we are part of the widely affected population,” said Lovejoy Mutongwiza, a journalist from 263Chat in Zimbabwe.

“Back in my country, I will be volunteering to share this knowledge with targeted groups, which include youth groups that deal with sexual and reproduction health and rights, and other key populations,” he said.

Supporting young people’s role in building sustainable peace

UNFPA, building on its comparative advantage of working with and for young people in development and humanitarian settings, plays a significant part in supporting young people’s role in building sustainable peace.

The aim of the workshop was to boost youth-led organizational capacity for and involvement in preparedness and humanitarian response, including building the resilience of young people, as well as social cohesion, peace-building and conflict prevention.

The event was organized by UNFPA East and Southern Africa Regional Office, in collaboration with UNFPA New York and the World Organization of the Scouts Movement.

Source: ReliefWeb

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Morocco: French Montana continues giving back, funds preschool in Morocco

French Montana has steadily been building a reputation for himself as one of hip-hop’s most generous artists for quite some time now.

According to TMZ, the Moroccan-born rapper is once again taking his philanthropic efforts to his home country. This time, French will be funding a new preschool to help provide the youth with access to education.

As reported, French will be aiding two different classrooms in the Sabae School of Fida-Mers Sultan. In addition, he also will be providing supplies and helping maintain the classrooms as time goes on.

Just last month, keeping in the same humanitarian vein, French participated in the Mass Bailout movement, which is dedicated to helping pay bail for incarcerated women and children who cannot afford to do so themselves.

On top of that, the “Unforgettable” rapper also has funded the Suubi “Hope” Health Center maternal hospital in Uganda. He teamed up with Sean “Diddy” Combs, Ciroc, The Weeknd and others to help raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for the cause and was able to build a three-story hospital specifically to help care for women and children in need. As a result of his work in Uganda, he was named rap’s first-ever Global Citizen Ambassador.

He also recently donated proceeds from his “Famous” remix with Adam Levine to the “We Are the Dream” campaign, which helps undocumented immigrants go to college.

Although he has built a solid name for himself in the music business as a rapper and entertainer, the ever-humble French has often referred to his charitable efforts as the “biggest accomplishments” in his career.

Source: REVOLT

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Namibia: Youth Charity Endures Funding Problem

By Strauss Lunyangwe

The Physical Active Youth Namibia (P.A.Y.) which caters for 120 youths that come from low-income households, is seeking sponsorship for a feeding program that costs N$16,400 monthly to daily feed scores of school children from destitute families.

This specific program exists to alleviate childhood hunger by availing a nutritious lunch and two sandwiches weekdays and on weekends.

The organization constantly has to approach family members, friends and partners to try and keep the scheme going. It currently offers learners from grades 1 – 12 with a supervised after-school environment, that focuses on physical health, academic status, personal development, from 13h00 to 17h00.

Learners are allowed to make use of its library and computer room, participate in gardening activities and take a shower for those that do not have proper bathing or a shower at home.

The program has two full-time and four part-time staff members, and is supported by the Ministry of Sport, Youth and National Service in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and Social Services.

Project manager Ursula Matzopoulos said they all participate in the day-to-day work such as cleaning, cooking, teaching and mentoring the children. In what started out for her as volunteering from 14h00 to 17h00 ended with her doing it on a full-time basis.

She stressed funding is their biggest challenge. “We want children to do well in life, but how do you do well if you are hungry?”

The program improves learners’ mathematical skills, tutoring through educational games and robotic skills. They also include sporting activities such as BMX riding, soccer, swimming and basketball.

NAMAs award-winning jazz saxophonist Susy Eises donated N$15,000 from the proceeds she made during a fundraising gala dinner she held last month.

“I truly believe the work they do here is very important to the children. I was just attracted to this program and in a way, I’m helping them get opportunities in life which I also got when I was young,” she explained.

Matzopoulos urged private businesses or patriotic Namibians to visit the centre to witness first- hand the work being done and see how children interact with each other after school

P.A.Y. Namibia is situated at the Multipurpose Youth Resource Centre in Katutura.

Source

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