Report: Internet blackout and a week of violence in Zimbabwe


By Makhosazana Kunene


There is a lot of violence now in Zimbabwe with a communication shutdown and big protests this week. Some people are dead, others are hurt and some are arrested.

Reporting is difficult. The internet and social media was completely cut off Friday and only opened late in the evening.

Shops have been closed and transportation is not operating.

People have been told to stay inside at home because if you go outside you might die. It is a tough situation.

A strike started on Monday with the announcement about the increase in the price of petrol.

According to a Friday morning report by Reuters, Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa raised fuel prices by 150 percent. A gallon of gas was almost $13, the story said, the most expensive in the world.

Protesters said they will not stop until the president resigns.

It got worse as the week went on.

On Friday, the situation was better in some places, but in other areas, including certain townships, people were breaking into shops and vandalizing.


Source Youthjournalism


Zimbabwe: Police badly assault MDC Youth leader


By Mandla Ndlovu


Police on Monday allegedly assaulted MDC Youth leader Discent Collins Bajila during violent protests that rocked Zimbabwe. Bajila was in Bulawayo when the incident happened.

Meanwhile police in Chitungwiza reportedly killed two people during the protests. this prompted protestors to burn down Makoni police station.


Source Bulawayo24


5 Steps to Be Taken Seriously As a young Entrepreneur


By Joshua Davidson


I remember the days of walking door-to-door in my home town, asking small businesses the opportunity to allow me to create for them a website. The entire first month that I began Chop Dawg, I was turned down over 100 times. Yes that is right; I kept count. It wasn’t until the very last shopping center that I talked to in my town that our first closed contract would be signed — or even acknowledged.

Being a young entrepreneur was rough at the start. Let’s face it, I was an overly excited kid with way too much hair. I couldn’t dress professionally, even if the clothes were laid out in front of me, and had a little to no track record to back myself up. To make matters worse, having a sales pitch nailed down at the beginning wasn’t even my forte either.

So how did I overcome this and end up making Chop Dawg what it is today?

1) Build a Portfolio

This is the most critical of the five steps that I am sharing with you. You need a backing, a calling card, proof that you can deliver as a first time entrepreneur to potential clients. Validation is key. You need to have a portfolio, a case study, an example of what it is that you are trying to sell that you have delivered in the past.

When I started Chop Dawg, I honestly used the fake it until you make it mentality. I had created multiple websites for my own personal benefit, for my own skillset, and knowledge growth. This ended up making the first portfolio that I would share with potential clients at the time. The thing is, I had all the confidence in the world because I honestly believed (and knew) that my stuff blew away the competition in my town. The end result? Ability to sign my first (few) clients and begin growing my business from there.

2) Build a Reputation

When you begin working with others, focus on maintaining the highest quality of customer service possible, create (or provide) the best product possible, and make sure to really learn your clients. I am not just talking about their businesses, learn about them. What do they like? What are they into? What are their passions? What can you learn from them?

When you do this, you are now building the start of your reputation. They will pass this along to their colleagues, friends, neighbors, and family and word will travel. Nothing is more powerful than word of mouth. We still use this today to bring in many of our new clients, using our existing client relationships. Hell, even the ones that aren’t referring us, we use them as a reference. It is a mutually beneficial relationship. However, you can’t just count on this. You need to over deliver to establish this trust, this relationship, and this reputation. Always go above and beyond for your clients.

3) Use the Networks of Others

Circling back from above, use the networks of your first customers to your advantage. Odds are, most entrepreneurs know other entrepreneurs. Most executives know other executives. Most sales people know others in sales. We all talk and network with one another, especially in the same verticals, when it comes to our industries. Odds are, that means they know your exact target audience, since you’re already working with them. Again, merging your reputation, portfolio, and track record with an existing customer — use this all to your benefit. Don’t forget too, name dropping people you have worked with that others would know is a huge advantage to being taken seriously.

Another shot of a young me (Joshua Davidson) back when I started Chop Dawg in 2009.

4) Dress the Part

I am not suggesting that you should be showing up to new customer meetings in a tuxedo, but don’t dress as many young individuals do. I made this mistake personally, and trust me, I probably left thousands of dollars on the table at a young age due to this costly mistake.

It is proven that when you dress well, people take you seriously, no matter how young or old that you are. I make it a point every day to always wear a button up and, at least, presentable clothing around that. Do the same. Dress how you would want people to treat you and to think of you. Show that you care about yourself as much as you care about your new business venture and your customers. First impressions are key and again, tie into all of the factors listed above.

5) Leverage Your Young Age to Your Advantage

This is honestly the most underrated aspect of being a young entrepreneur (which I miss) — people eat up a great story. Nothing was better than the free publicity that I used to get from colleagues, clients, and even the media about being a 16–18 year old entrepreneur with a thriving and growing business. People love this, because it is that classic underdog story; it is the story of someone doing something most people dream about doing. And above all, it makes a great story. Leverage this to your advantage for free advertising, free word of mouth, and free traction, which you cannot leverage later on life. This is an opportunity of a lifetime for some — use it.

Starting my company at such a young age was the greatest decision that I ever made. I never envisioned Chop Dawg to be the company that it is today, helping everyday entrepreneurs with technical ideas, and turning them into reality. With that mentioned, it was a blessing to go through a lot of the learning curves early on in life. And for those who are young and on the fence about starting, my suggestion for you is just to start. You’ll learn as you go, you will make mistakes, but most importantly, if you are a real entrepreneur, you will learn over time exactly what problems need solutions and how to monetize those solutions to turn your startup into a thriving company.


This article was first published at www.medium.com


3 Crucial Marketing Tips For Young Entrepreneurs


By Nicolas Cole


We live in a day and age now where entrepreneurship is “cool.”

I remember being a teenager, obsessed with the World of Warcraft and online blogging, and being met with complete and total opposition when it came to building a career for myself on the Internet.

Today, digital entrepreneurship is exceedingly common.

In fact, more and more young people see the Internet as their greatest asset for turning what they love into a viable career path.

If you want to get into entrepreneurship at a young age, then here are 3 lessons that took me a while to learn—and will hopefully save you some valuable time.

1. What’s Your “Reason To Believe?”

This is a lesson I learned working at my first (and only) job out of college, a digital marketing agency in Chicago called Idea Booth.

If your product/service disappeared from the world tomorrow, what would the world be missing?

Would anyone care?

It’s a tough question, but it’s also the most important question.

Why should people pay attention to what you’re doing?

Why should people BELIEVE in you!

Successful marketing comes from having a clear vision free of rationalization. As a mentor of mine, Ron Gibori, used to tell me:

“The moment you start rationalizing with your customer, you’ve stopped selling them the dream and started selling them a product or service.”

You shouldn’t have to “convince” anyone.

People should hear your message and want what you have to offer.

Before you really start marketing what you do or whatever it is you’re selling, you have to come to some conclusion as to what you want them to BELIEVE about you.

2. Quality and then More Quality

There’s this common misconception in the digital age that what you share online should be good, but it shouldn’t be everything you know.

You shouldn’t reveal your secret recipe — that’s what people pay for!

FALSE.

The best blog posts and content pieces are the ones that walk any person through the tough questions.

They’re the ones that “bare all” and tell it exactly like it is.

Virality is not always about shock value or entertainment. It’s about REAL value.

It’s about educating a reader to the point where they feel as though you just gave them something of extreme value without them having to pay a cent for it.

This is what earns their trust and makes them willing to then become a customer or consumer in the future.

So, when marketing your product or service, over-deliver.

Give more than you should.

Share relentlessly and show people that you aren’t just selling something.

You are giving—and giving far more than is required.

3. If You Can’t Measure It, Don’t Do It.

Another saying my mentor, Ron, used to tell me all the time:

“If you can’t measure it, don’t do it.”
What this means is, you might think you have a great idea, you might love how it looks and feels and you think everyone is going to love it…

…but take a step back.

How are you going to measure its success?

And more importantly, is this effort continuing to drive the larger goal for your business?

Young entrepreneurs fall into the trap of wanting to do “everything.”

It’s a never-ending cycle of throwing things at the wall and seeing what sticks.

And rarely is this approach a good idea.

It’s far better to get clear on your end goal, find ways to work towards that goal, and then put specific metrics in place that will help give you feedback as to whether or not you are moving in the right direction — or if you’re moving too slow or too fast.

Without measurement, your efforts will leave you feeling like you’re doing A LOT without getting much DONE.


This article was first published at www.artplusmarketing.com


8 Wacky Entrepreneur Stories to Inspire Your Own Business Success


By Adam Heitzman


Many entrepreneurs are known for being colorful characters, here are 8 colorful stories to help inspire your own business success.

The business world might appear buttoned-down from the outside — but in reality, it’s a lot more interesting than you might realize. Many entrepreneurs are known for being colorful characters, both at work and in their personal lives. After all, following rules and staying inside the lines doesn’t often make for business success! From winning seed money in a poker game to attempting to clone dinosaurs, here are eight unexpected things that entrepreneurs have done.

1. John Paul DeJoria Bounced Back from Homelessness

You’ve probably heard of Paul Mitchell hair products and Patrón tequila, but did you know these brands have a common origin? John Paul DeJoria co-founded both legendary companies, becoming a billionaire along the way. The path to success wasn’t always easy for him, though. DeJoria spent time on the streets twice. The first time he was homeless, he was only 22 and had a two-year-old son to care for. He persisted in his entrepreneurial vision, though, eventually co-founding John Paul Mitchell Systems with $700 in startup cash. Today, DeJoria is a philanthropist who supports a number of social causes. Among other things, he helps to provide resources to people dealing with homelessness.

2. David Daneshgar Won Startup Money by Playing Poker

What’s the quickest way to come up with $30,000? If you’re a card shark like David Daneshgar, the answer might be to sign up for a poker tournament. Daneshgar and two friends wanted to start an online marketplace connecting florists with customers, but they didn’t have startup cash. So Daneshgar — who won the World Series of Poker in 2008 — spent $1000 to enter a poker tournament. The grand prize of $30,000 was, coincidentally, just the amount of money they needed. At the end of the tense final round, Daneshgar told his friends what they wanted to hear: “It’s flower time.” They launched their business, BloomNation, soon afterwards.

3. Seth Priebatsch Took Dedication to a New Level — While Barefoot

In 2011, SCVNGR — a social app similar to FourSquare — was a $100 million company with a rather non-traditional CEO. Founder Seth Priebatsch, the self-described “chief ninja” of the company, was 22 years old at the time, and he had a habit of eschewing footwear at the office. He also sported a bright orange shirt every day and rarely went home from work, preferring to sleep in his office. Priebatsch transformed SCVNGR into a mobile payments platform called LevelUp in 2012, but he kept his title of Chief Ninja and his signature orange shirt.

4. Nicholas Berggruen Decided Not to Bother Buying a House

For most billionaire businesspeople, having more than one home is par for the course. But for years, Nicholas Berggruen avoided ever buying a house at all. He opted to live exclusively in hotels while traveling the world instead, which earned him the curious nickname of “the homeless billionaire.” Recently, though, Berggruen decided to put down some roots. He finally bought a $40 million house in 2017, perhaps wishing to give his two young children a stable place to grow up.

5. Mark Zuckerberg Killed His Own Food

In 2011, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg undertook a personal challenge to only eat meat that he killed himself. He announced this challenge to the world with his now-infamous status update, “I just killed a pig and a goat,” on May 4, 2011. Zuckerberg soon clarified that he took on the challenge in an effort to learn about sustainable farming and to consume resources more responsibly. The change wasn’t permanent, though. After the year-long challenge was over, Zuckerberg went back to buying meat at the store.

6. Clive Palmer Tried to Clone a Dinosaur

What if Jurassic Park wasn’t just a movie? Eccentric Australian businessman Clive Palmer wanted to make dinosaurs a reality through cloning, and he went so far as to discuss the idea with scientists. This happened in 2012, and since cloning techniques still haven’t advanced enough to bring back extinct species, it doesn’t look like Palmer’s dreams will be coming to fruition anytime soon. However, his love for dinosaurs abides. In 2013, he opened a theme park called Palmersaurusthat features over 160 enormous dinosaur replicas.

7. Mark Benioff Staged a Protest to Steal a Competitor’s Spotlight

Mark Benioff, one of the founders of Salesforce, is notorious for coming up with over-the-top (and sometimes inflammatory) marketing gimmicks. Most famously, he once orchestrated a fake protest at a Siebel Systems conference, complete with picket signs, chanting, and even a fake TV crew. This drummed up a lot of attention for Salesforce at his rival’s expense. On another occasion, Benioff arranged to rent an airport’s entire taxi fleet right before another Siebel event was held nearby. He then had his employees pitch Salesforce on the way to the event, much to Siebel’s displeasure.

8. Robert Klark Graham Tried to Create a Genius Sperm Bank

Robert K. Graham was an entrepreneur who invented shatter-proof lenses for eyeglasses. Today, though, he’s probably better remembered for the controversial sperm bank he started. Called the Repository for Germinal Choice, this sperm bank only accepted donations from people who were considered extraordinary in some way. Some were Nobel prize winners, some were geniuses, and some were gifted athletes. Graham’s reason for starting the sperm bank? He wanted to create a better human gene pool — a mission that did not go over well with many people, who compared his ideas to Nazi eugenics programs. The sperm bank was closed in 1999, two years after Graham’s death. It claimed to have produced 229 children during its 19 years of operation.

Wrapping Up

Entrepreneurship tends to attract people with unique minds and strong personalities, and that can make for a lot of interesting stories. Do you have any wacky entrepreneur moments of your own to share? We’d love to read your stories, whether inspiring or just plain entertaining, below!


This article was first published at www.medium.com


10 Different Ways To Encourage Youth Entrepreneurship


By Robyn D. Shulman


Social Entrepreneurs


I cover the intersection of education and entrepreneurship.


In 2010, world-renowned education and innovation expert, Sir Ken Robinson released a short animated film, titled Changing Education Paradigms. In the video, Robinson argues that our current education system stifles and anesthetizes creativity while it lowers the capacity for divergent thinking.

Robinson states, “Divergent thinking is not the same thing as creative thinking, but that it is an essential capacity for creativity.” He also refers to a paper clip study in the book Breakpoint and Beyond: Mastering the Future Today, by George Land and Beth Jarman. The paper clip study followed 1,500 kindergarten students through elementary, middle and high school.

As the students moved up through grade levels, the authors asked the question: “How many uses can you think of for a paper clip?” When the authors first proposed the question in kindergarten, 98% of students scored at genius level in divergent thinking. By the age of 10 years old, only 32% of the same group scored as high, and by age 15, only 10% remained at genius level.

Rather than developing the natural gifts of curiosity and high-level thinking, the traditional teaching model we still use today can stifle creativity, innovation, and divergent thinking.

Unfortunately, for most, our current school system does not align with 21st-century student needs, or the rapid changes we see on an economic, social, and global level.

Many parents are not aware of the misalignment between education and the unknown jobs of tomorrow. The common belief about securing a job right out of college no longer holds true. In fact, for many, college is simply not the right path. According to Student Loan Hero, Americans owe over $1.4 trillion in student loan debt, and the average Class of 2016 graduate has $37,172 in student loan debt. Although unemployment rates have dropped, many Millennials work in low-paying, entry-level positions far away from their field of undergraduate studies.

Given these statistics, it is critical for all adults to pave a better road for the next generation and to encourage entrepreneurship.

If you have a young child or work with children, here are ten things you can do now to introduce entrepreneurship skills early.

Encourage divergent thinking:

Through informal discussions, ask open-ended questions, work on problem-solving, share ideas and build on learning experiences together. Teach children to question, research, and ask for further information. Ask them to take notice of things in their daily lives. For example, when they see a problem or feel frustrated about something, ask them how they would solve the issue, or make it better. Let your child guide, discover and make connections on their own. When the opportunity presents itself, practice divergent thinking at home.

Create a safe-space for ideas:

Divergent thinking is most likely to thrive in a safe environment that welcomes all types of ideas, encourages risk-taking and allows for fast failure. Kids who feel safe are more likely to share ideas, step outside of their comfort zones, and take on more challenges. You can support divergent thinking, encourage individual expression and foster creativity by building a safe space for youth.

Challenge ideas:

Encourage your children to ask why we do things in a certain way. Teach them to look at problems and find various solutions. When we make challenges, it forces us to begin thinking of alternatives.

Encourage leaders through ownership:

Praise kids for unique ideas to solving problems, and for having the confidence to share their solutions. You can also refer to their ideas with unique names such as “Stacy’s Solution” or “Anthony’s Answers.”

Build an Idea Box:

When I taught middle school, many parents asked me how to encourage innovation at home. In my classroom, I kept an empty box for students to drop idea notes. When they had an idea, figured out how to solve a problem, or noticed how to make an improvement, they wrote down their thoughts, and added them to the “Idea Box.” At the end of the week, we went through these various ideas together.

You can create an “Idea Box” at home while including the entire family. Using this strategy can encourage everyone to share new possible ventures, foster communication skills, and build confidence in a group setting.

After you’ve gone through some viable ideas, encourage kids to take action.

Provide experiences:

Take your kids to different places and let them explore. Pay attention to their natural curiosities and guide them toward those interests. As they grow, you can begin to see naturally born passions. Their creativity and innovation will come to the forefront when they participate in things they enjoy doing.

Let kids fail:

Let your children fail and teach them how to learn from their mistakes. Show them how to get back up, self-reflect on what they learned, and move on. Failure teaches kids how to be resilient in any situation, and it is critical for building self-confidence and a healthy mindset.

Financial literacy:

Schools do not teach financial literacy nearly as much as they should. Introduce money early on and give them goals and responsibilities for managing their finances. Show them the importance of saving and investing. Open a savings or checking account with them. If possible, give them an incentive to save money by offering a matching contribution.

Model positive relationships:

Entrepreneurs understand the importance of pursuing and building meaningful relationships. People like to work with and purchase goods from those they find likeable. Talk with your kids about their friendships, and focus on the importance of compassion, giving back and listening.

Communicate:

Many nights, my daughter and I chat about my work day and her school day. Through these casual conversations, she understands the power she has to go after her dreams while understanding reality at the same time. Make communication a priority as well as a safe place to talk about ideas, answer questions, and be a sounding board. Communication is key to divergent thinking, creativity, and successful entrepreneurship, and the model must start at home.

By cultivating continuous improvement in these areas, we can give children the confidence to move outside their comfort zones, provide mental tools for growth, encourage creativity and support future entrepreneurs.

Although some schools are embracing this new way of thinking, many are still far behind in the industrial age of teaching and learning. Don’t depend on a school to bring these critical skills and successful life strategies to the forefront.

Always keep the paper clip in mind. Encourage your kids to see their paper clips in many different ways throughout their school years. You may find your child is a natural born entrepreneur.

If you are interested in divergent thinking, education, creativity, and entrepreneurship, you will find tremendous value in the video below presented by RSA Animate and Sir Ken Robinson


I am honored to be named LinkedIn’s #1 Top Voice in Education, 2018. I am also the founder of EdNews Daily and the Managing Editor at Influencer Inc. In addition, I also…MORE
Honored to be named LinkedIn’s #1 Top Voice in Education, 2018. Certified K-9 and ESL teacher, Executive Editor, Influencer Inc and currently run all thought-leadership pieces for 51Talk, China.


This article was first published at www.forbes.com


Government and church working to ease youths’ suffering in Zambia

Government has partnered with the church to alleviate difficulties affecting young people in the country, Central Province Minister Sydney Mushanga has disclosed.

Mr. Mushanga said it was saddening to see youths engaging themselves in illegal activities such as corruption, drug abuse and early marriages due to economic challenges they face.

He said government and the church have potential to lead the country to greater heights of development and youth empowerment programmes.

The Province Minister said this through the Assistant Secretary, Mwape Kasanda during the official opening of the 2018 National Youth General Conference organized by Word of Faith Soul Wining Ministries, under the theme ‘crossing over to the other side’.

He said implementing and supporting programmes which are aimed at empowering youths through the word of God is a sure way of addressing some of the challenges affecting youths in the country.

Mr. Mushanga added that such programmes create a suitable platform for youths to be socially enlightened as they mingle with their God fearing friends.

He has since assured Zambians that government will always support any organization that is undertaking developmental projects aimed at benefiting the community.

Mr. Mushanga further urged youths to take advantage of the conference to learn and be equipped with knowledge in order to become relevant to the country’s development agenda.

And Word of Faith Soul Wining Ministries National Youth Secretary Reuben Mwale said the conference was held annually to train and build youths morally through the word of God.

Pastor Mwale noted that the number of youths getting involved in doing wrong things such as drug abuse and early marriages has increased in the country.

He added that through such conferences, youths are empowered with various activities to ensure that education becomes a priority in their lives as opposed to involving themselves in vices.

Pastor Mwale has since pledged continued partnership with government to ensure that the dream of attaining a smart and prosperous Zambia is achieved.

This article was first published on Lusaka Times

5 Ways to Drive Youth-Inclusive Economic Growth in Africa

By Bill Reese

The rate of working poverty among youth in Sub-Saharan Africa, a staggering 70 percent of whom earn less than $2 a day, has become one of the great economic and social challenges of our time. IYF, like so many others in the youth development field, has been working to ensure more of Africa’s young people have access to the job and entrepreneurship training opportunities they need to lead independent and productive lives. Knowing the magnitude of the task remaining, I was delighted to join a number of visionary and hardworking African government ministers of youth, corporate leaders, members of the U.S. Congress, and representatives from USAID, State Department, and the World Bank to discuss how best to promote youth-inclusive policies for growth.

At the September 8 meeting, organized by the Africa Society, discussion centered on evidence-based policies and best practices as well as investment in high-impact sectors to scale up quality employment efforts. Here are some of my takeaways from IYF’s experience:

1. Partner with an array of government ministries in each country.

Governments remain fundamental allies in creating and sustaining a youth-inclusive economic growth strategy across Africa, as in the rest of the world. Education and youth ministries have always played a key role; however, the youth development community must fully engage other ministries, including finance, tourism, commerce, trade, mining, and agriculture. At IYF, we’ve seen this diversification advance the objective of more and better market-driven training opportunities. It also offers an opportunity for these ministries to break down silos and benefit from greater communication and cooperation.

2. Build ties with the business community that go beyond CSR.

Public-private partnerships are vital to any effort to boost youth employment. But to be effective, we must look beyond traditional corporate social responsibility and develop partnerships where companies can embrace the business case for refining job and other skills-based training programs. These partnerships, combined with government involvement, contribute to the multi-stakeholder alliances critical to ensuring young people gain the skills necessary to meet existing and future market demands.

3. Encourage hands-on training.

Take Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) systems, which we’ve been increasingly working with in Sub-Saharan Africa to prepare youth for real career opportunities. To be successful, young TVET enrollees need on-the-job experience through internships and apprenticeships. In Kenya, for example, IYF works with Barclays Bank to deliver a sports-based work readiness training initiative (in this case, using soccer) that includes experience in specialties such as masonry and machine operation on live job sites. Young graduates like Joseph and Linnet go on to flourish in jobs in construction, a growing sector of the economy.

4. Value curriculum-based life skills training as a key component of successful youth programming.

More and more companies and governments agree that non-cognitive skills—including teamwork, conflict management, and communication—help young people succeed as students, workers, parents, and citizens. In IYF’s experience with Passport to Success®, we’ve found that using a curriculum-based, locally tailored approach is the best way to make the teaching of these essential skills scalable. IYF is currently developing a global online exam to measure students’ life skills and certify test-takers’ aptitudes.

5. Promote entrepreneurship and employment.

To support young men and women pursuing a lifetime of productive work, we must focus on both strategies. Out of choice or necessity, many of today’s youth are engaged in mixed livelihoods, moving from self-employment to a job in the informal economy and back again, or both at once. Young people need access to that kind of combined, holistic training, which IYF is exploring with The MasterCard Foundation in our Via initiative in Tanzania and Mozambique. Skills young people gain through entrepreneurship are useful not only to those seeking to launch or run a small business. Everyone seeking employment in today’s competitive job market needs to be creative, innovative, and entrepreneurial if he or she wants to get ahead.

Remember, while effective job, entrepreneurship, and life skills training programs help prepare young people for decent livelihoods, it’s a growing and vibrant economy—not the government acting alone—that drives job creation. Expanding manufacturing capabilities, investing in high-impact sectors such as hospitality and information technology, and building up a country’s infrastructure will all help boost the creation of much needed jobs across Africa. To reach the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals and end poverty, we must work together in every country to build economies that include and benefit everyone—the poor, minorities, women, and yes, young people.

This articles was first published on International Youth Foundation

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Nigeria: Unemployed youths, grave threat to security, development – FG

The Federal Government says the increasing number of unemployed youths in the country poses a great threat to the nation’s security and socioeconomic development.

Mr Olusade Adesola, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Youth and Sports Development, said this at a Multi Stakeholder meeting on the ‘Nigerian Youth Employment Action Plan and Global Initiative on Decent Jobs for Youths’ in Abuja.

The programme was organised by the Sports Enterprise and Promotion Department of the Ministry, in collaboration with the International Labour Organisation (ILO).

In his remarks at the occasion, Adesola said that youth unemployment remains a great challenge in the country and there was an urgent need to mitigate the problem and provide opportunities for economic engagement of the youths.

“To this end, the government with support from the ILO, developed the youth employment action plan which targets youths between the ages of 18 to 35, to address the fragmentation and harness technical and financial resources for meaningful impact.

“The energy, adaptability, creativity, openness to new ideas and learning are some of those things that makes Nigerian youths valuable potentials.

“The energy, adaptability, creativity, openness to new ideas and learning are some of those things that make Nigerian youths valuable potentials.

“These potentials of youths when not recognised, becomes a source of tension with negative consequences to national growth and development.

“With this understanding on the importance of youths, efforts are being made at regional, national and global levels, to set up structures and mechanisms to promote youth development focused on employment and sustainable livelihood, health care and education opportunities,” the official said.

He, however, expressed displeasure over the strict measures put in place by foreign embassies to obtain visas by youths scheduled to travel for international entrepreneurial conferences.

“I crave the indulgence of the ILO to engage all the missions and countries represented in Nigeria; when we present requests for visas to them for our youths to participate in international conferences, please let them look at those requests objectively.

“Our experiences in the past have not been palatable, any request to them with invitation they turn it down.

“They are not migrating but to acquire knowledge that when they come back, can help contribute to the development of Nigeria, ‘’ Adesola said.

On his part, the Director ILO country office in Nigeria, Mr Dennis Zulu, said that the national development plan directly targets the creation of jobs for the teeming population of unemployed youths in the country.

“It is important we work with many of the organisations to come up with a blueprint for job creation for the youths in Nigeria, which is coherent, integrated and which will stand the test of time,” he said.

Also speaking, Sen. Chris Ngige, Minister of Labour and Employment, commended the ILO for its interest and commitment in partnering with Nigeria towards addressing the challenging unemployment problem in the country.

He said the administration of President Muhammodu Buhuri has high premium placed on curbing the menace of youth’s unemployment and crimes in Nigeria.

“As part of the strategy to address the current unemployment problem, the ministry with the support of the ILO had reviewed the National Employment Policy that has been approved by government.

“The reviewed policy is a veritable instrument in addressing increasing disparity between economic growth and low capacity within the economy and to create decent and sustainable employment in the country, ‘’Ngige said.

Source: Pulse NG

SebenzaLIVE helps SA’s youth find work

An increasing number of qualified youths are looking for jobs in South Africa but have no luck finding any because of their lack of confidence or experience, or because they do not know where to find the right business opportunities.

SebenzaLIVE, now part of the SowetanLIVE website, is all about giving these youths a career kick-start by helping them present themselves better and achieve their goals.

Being informed is the key to success, so we will publish practical advice about employment; lifestyle and fashion tips for the young person who has just started working or is looking for a job; and even helpful information about starting or managing a small business.

We’re here for high school pupils; students enrolled at higher education and training institutions; graduates; unemployed youths; and small-business owners or entrepreneurs.

We will share practical information on internships, learnerships, bursaries, apprenticeships and small-business programmes and events organised by government departments and agencies, companies and corporate foundations.

You’ll also find features about the work lives of young people from different industries, to illustrate how they overcame obstacles in their own lives to pursue their dreams.

Source: Sowetan