African governments should make long-term investments in children, youth

The rapidly increasing of children and youth population in Africa poses a great challenge, which could otherwise be an opportunity if well harnessed, a new report revealed.

The African Report on Child Wellbeing 2018: Progress in the Child-Friendliness of African Governments, which was published in Ethiopia’s capital Addis Ababa on Friday, warned that Africa could be home to a billion angry, under-fed, under-educated and under-employed children and young people by 2050.

The report also urges African governments to commit themselves to massive long-term investment in nutrition, health and education of their children and young people so as to avert the danger.

Noting the challenges rising from the population boom in the continent, the report indicates that Africa is sitting “on a demographic time bomb.”

“Without massive long-term investment in nutrition, healthcare, education and employment, the growing child and youth population could become a huge burden, exacerbating poverty, inequality, unemployment and instability and creating a serious human development crisis,” it showed.

Assefa Bequele, Executive Director of the African Child Policy Forum (ACPF), which compiled the report, said that Africa can choose to reap the demographic dividend, nurture its human capital and accelerate sustainable and equitable development.

“Children have the potential to transform Africa – but if neglected, they will exacerbate the burden of poverty and inequality, whilst posing a serious threat to peace, security and prosperity,” Bequele said.

According to ACPF, close to half of all deaths in under-fives in Africa are associated with under-nutrition, while African children may attend school in large numbers, but they are not learning. Two in every five children leave primary school without learning how to read, write or do simple arithmetic.

The report was compiled based on the Child-Friendliness Index (CFI), which ranks 52 African nations on progress towards realizing the rights and wellbeing of children.

The CFI rates countries including Tunisia, South Africa, Egypt and Namibia as the most child-friendly African countries.

While South Sudan, Cameroon, Zambia, Liberia and Eritrea were among the least child-friendly countries.

The ranking was made based on a range of indicators including nutrition, education, budgets and social protection, it was indicated.

Source: Xinhua

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World Youth Forum (WYF) sends message reflecting Egypt’s security and stability

By Egypt Today staff

Head of the National Media Authority (NMA) Hussein Zein asserted that organizing the World Youth Forum (WYF) for the second year in a row conveys a clear message to the whole world that Egypt is a country of security and stability.

“The event reflects the fact that Egypt has restored its leading role in achieving peace, reconstruction and development in various fields,” Zein said.

Zein asserted that the forum, which will be held under the sponsorship of President Abdel Fatah al-Sisi in Sharm el Sheikh on November 3-6, spotlighting Sisi’s belief in the importance of the youth’s role in building a bright future for Egypt.

The great attention paid by the president to the forum emanates from his conviction that it will offer the opportunity to listen to the youths’ ideas and enhance dialogue in order to bring together points of view among the youths and decision makers across the world, he asserted.

The forum targets also establishing dialogue between the youths and the State to raise awareness about Egypt’s achievements in numerous domains, Zein reiterated.

The youth’s participation in the event reflects Egypt’s civilized image and sheds light on its unique regional and international status, Zein pointed.

The 2018 World Youth Forum (WYF) will convene in Egypt’s Sharm el-Sheikh between Nov. 2-6 with the participation of thousands of youth.

The WYF administration has received more than 35,000 applications from youth coming from 165 countries to participate in the forum so far, since it has opened registration on Aug. 18, the administration announced on Thursday. Some 30 percent of applicants are coming from Africa and Arab countries, while 70 percent of the applying youth are from other different countries, the statement added.

The administration opened a live chat for direct communication with the youth, who are interested in attending the forum, to help solve any technical problems that may face them during registration.

The WYF in its second annual version will tackle two main axes: peace and development.

The first axis will discuss reconstructing post-conflict countries and societies, the role of world leaders in achieving peace, the duty of the international community to provide humanitarian assistance, counter-terrorism issues, and Euro-Mediterranean Partnership.

The theme of the development will include topics related to energy and water security, empowerment of people with disabilities, the role of voluntary work in building societies, the agenda of 2063 African Sustainable Development, digital citizenship, the role of art and cinema in shaping communities, ways to build future leaders, and the means of shrinking the gender gap in the work force.

An Arab-African Summit Simulation Model will be held on the sidelines of the Forum, as was recommended during the African Union Simulation Model held in May 2018 as part of the activation of the recommendations of the 2017 World Youth Forum.

The first edition of the World Youth Forum was launched from Nov. 4-10, 2017 in Sharm el-Sheikh. It was attended by 3,200 participants from 113 countries. The forum was a platform for 222 speakers from 64 countries with expertise in various fields, gathered in 46 sessions.

In the 2017 edition, the participating leaders and experts discussed various international and regional issues, including crises of migration and refugees, democracy and human rights, African stability and development, and globalization and cultural identity, as well as the technology and social media and their impact on the population.

Source: Egypt Today

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Uganda: Shungura Foundation Boss Urges Gov’t to Involve Youth in Policy Formulation

By Kampala Post Reporter

The Chief Executive Officer Shungura Foundation, Joan Kyokutamba has urged government to involve young people in designing and implementing policies, programs and services that are directed at them.

Kyokutamba made the call while addressing participants at the Public Health Youth Symposium organized by Public Health Ambassadors Uganda (PHAU) at Hotel Africana on Thursday.

Reflecting on the Youth Livelihood Fund (YLF), Kyokutamba said the project needs to be revised to incorporate youth program officers short of which it will not achieve its intended goals.

“Youth involvement helps ensure that policy actions are relevant and also helps develop youth as partners and leaders in development. It is important that youth are viewed as assets and active agents of change, who can contribute their thoughts to the country’s development,” Kyokutamba said.

Acknowledging the importance of engaging youth in shaping the country’s future, Kyokutamba noted that there is also need to involve the private sector in key unemployment interventions.

“By considering ways to translate the potential and enthusiasm of the young generation into assets for positive advancement and development, then Uganda will be on a steady roadmap to achieving the 2040 vision,” Kyokutamba added.

In his address, Richard Ssempala, a Health Economist at Makerere School of Public Health described the symposium as “a unique and timely initiative”. “This symposium brings unique values because we won’t only discuss the problems affecting the youth but also reflect together on solutions coming from young people who represent a big part of the society,” Ssempala said.

Hope Nzeire, the Senior National Program Officer National Population council said that sustainable development and economic growth as a promise of a demographic dividend can only be achieved by implementing new, forward-looking strategies that promote youth engagement, inclusion and representation socially, economically and politically.

“For a demographic dividend to occur, a window of opportunity created by reductions in infant mortality and sustainable fertility rates through enhanced use of contraception directly translates into a demographic shift to fewer dependents that can be comfortably taken care of by the working age population. This way we can get to reverse the pyramid shape of our population with more productivity that will turn around the fortunes of our economy as a country,” she noted.

The symposium, organized under the theme “Working Towards Sustainable Development: Harnessing the Demographic Dividend Through Investing in Uganda’s Youth”, brought together public health professionals, researchers, advocates and young people

Source: Kampala

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Uganda: Shungura Foundation Boss Urges Gov’t to Involve Youth in Policy Formulation

By Kampala Post Reporter

The Chief Executive Officer Shungura Foundation, Joan Kyokutamba has urged government to involve young people in designing and implementing policies, programs and services that are directed at them.

Kyokutamba made the call while addressing participants at the Public Health Youth Symposium organized by Public Health Ambassadors Uganda (PHAU) at Hotel Africana on Thursday.

Reflecting on the Youth Livelihood Fund (YLF), Kyokutamba said the project needs to be revised to incorporate youth program officers short of which it will not achieve its intended goals.

“Youth involvement helps ensure that policy actions are relevant and also helps develop youth as partners and leaders in development. It is important that youth are viewed as assets and active agents of change, who can contribute their thoughts to the country’s development,” Kyokutamba said.

Acknowledging the importance of engaging youth in shaping the country’s future, Kyokutamba noted that there is also need to involve the private sector in key unemployment interventions.

“By considering ways to translate the potential and enthusiasm of the young generation into assets for positive advancement and development, then Uganda will be on a steady roadmap to achieving the 2040 vision,” Kyokutamba added.

In his address, Richard Ssempala, a Health Economist at Makerere School of Public Health described the symposium as “a unique and timely initiative”. “This symposium brings unique values because we won’t only discuss the problems affecting the youth but also reflect together on solutions coming from young people who represent a big part of the society,” Ssempala said.

Hope Nzeire, the Senior National Program Officer National Population council said that sustainable development and economic growth as a promise of a demographic dividend can only be achieved by implementing new, forward-looking strategies that promote youth engagement, inclusion and representation socially, economically and politically.

“For a demographic dividend to occur, a window of opportunity created by reductions in infant mortality and sustainable fertility rates through enhanced use of contraception directly translates into a demographic shift to fewer dependents that can be comfortably taken care of by the working age population. This way we can get to reverse the pyramid shape of our population with more productivity that will turn around the fortunes of our economy as a country,” she noted.

The symposium, organized under the theme “Working Towards Sustainable Development: Harnessing the Demographic Dividend Through Investing in Uganda’s Youth”, brought together public health professionals, researchers, advocates and young people

Source: Kampala

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Second Edition of World Youth Forum Kicks Off Saturday

By Sara Ahmed

International delegations from around the world are pouring into Egypt as the World Youth Forum (WYF) gears up to kick off on Saturday.

The annual forum, held from 3 to 6 November under the auspices of President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi, will be taking place in Egypt’s Red Sea resort town of Sharm El-Sheikh.

This year, around 5,000 Egyptian and foreign youths will be participating, as well as experts, journalists, public figures and officials from more than 50 countries. The forum is expected to tackle topics such as e-sports, empowering those with disabilities, entrepreneurship and gender with a special focus on development, peace and creativity.

The forum ‘engages youth from around the globe in an enriching set-up, allowing them to exchange views and recommend initiatives to decision-makers and influential figures’ as per its official website. It does so through plenary sessions, workshops and round table discussions.

It also aims at engaging its participants with policymakers and providing networking opportunities for youth aiming at bringing about positive change.

In 2017, the WYF took place in November and spanned over six days.

In particular, this year’s theme revolves around the Egyptian identity and envisioning a better Africa in accordance with the African Union’s Agenda 2063.

Since 2016, four national youth conferences have been held by the Egyptian government. The four conferences were held in Sharm El-Sheikh, Aswan, Ismailia, and Alexandria and have witnessed more than 10,000 participants representing youth from various sectors of Egyptian society.

Source: Egyptian Street

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Palestinian President to Attend World Youth Forum in Egypt

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas will travel to Egypt soon to attend the opening of the Second World Youth Forum (WYF), the Arab League announced in Cairo.

According to the permanent delegate to the Arab League, Diab Al-Loh, the Palestinian leader will head his country’s high-level delegation to the WYF, scheduled from November 3 to 6 in the Egyptian tourist city of Sharm El-Sheik, on the Red Sea.

The official from the regional bloc added that Abbas will arrive in Egypt on Friday in response to an invitation from President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi.

Al-Loh, who is also the Palestinian ambassador in Cairo, noted the two leaders are expected to meet to discuss the latest developments in Palestine, as well as other issues of mutual interest.

Delegations from around the world began arriving in Sharm El-Sheikh on Wednesday to take part in the WYF. The meeting is expected to be attended by some 5,000 younths, journalists, public figures and officials from more than 50 countries.

The forum will focus on peace, development, creativity and innovation, as well as the visions and aspirations of youths in the world.

Source: Plenglish

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Egypt: Belarus in support of Sisi initiative to bring together all world youths

By Mena

CAIRO – 31 October 2018: Belarus Ambassador Sergei Rachkov reiterated his country’s support of President Abdel Fatah al-Sisi’s initiative to bring together youths from all over the world to meet in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el Sheikh.

He lauded the success of the first edition of World Youth Forum (WYF) that was held in Sharm el Sheikh on November 4-10, 2017 .

The diplomat told MENA on Wednesday that he will represent his country at the forum, to take place on November 3-6.

He said Belarus attaches great importance to youths and programs focusing on education and development.

He added that a memo of understanding will be signed soon between the Egyptian Youth and Sports Ministry and Belarus Education Ministry to boost bilateral cooperation in outlining youth-related policies.

Source

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Kenya calls for youth empowerment to spur Africa’s transformation agenda

African governments are urged to implement affirmative action policies to ensure the youthful population is at the center of the continent’s quest for economic progress alongside social and political renewal.

Kenya in conjunction with multilateral partners is hosting the three-day Africa Youth Conference in Nairobi whose theme is prioritizing investments in African youth within the post-2015 Agenda.

Margaret Kobia, Cabinet Secretary for Youth and Gender Affairs, told delegates, including policymakers and campaigners, that policy incentives coupled with life-long learning and access to capital were key to ensure the young generation is part of Africa’s socio-economic transformation.

“Africa is grappling with a youth bulge that should be harnessed to make a positive contribution to the continent’s envisaged growth and transformation agenda,” Kobia remarked.

“We must scale up best practices to ensure the youth have gainful employment, skills and seed capital required to make them self-reliant and resilient,” she added.

The 2018 Africa Youth Conference sought to spotlight strategic areas that the continent’s youthful population can be actively engaged to promote economic growth, peace, stability and environmental sustainability.

Kobia said that greater participation of the youth is key to modernizing and enhancing the competitiveness of African economies in the era of globalization.

“Our governments should create an enabling environment for the youth to participate in the digital economy that is unleashing the next wave of prosperity in the continent,” said Kobia.

Multilateral institutions have rallied behind concerted efforts by African countries to tackle youth unemployment, skills deficit and social exclusion that poses existential threat to the continent’s stability and progress.

Izeduwa Derex-Briggs, the Eastern and Southern Africa Region Director for UN Women, said that competence-based learning, mentorship and easy access to start-up capital is key to ensuring African youth contribute optimally to the continent’s growth agenda.

“African youth are resilient and can be drivers of change if they have access to requisite skills, technologies, innovations and mentorship,”said Derex-Briggs, adding that growth of social enterprises in Africa is being fueled by the youth.

The International Labor Organization says that 3 in every 5 unemployed people in Sub-Saharan Africa are youth hence exposing them to poverty and social ills like crime, drug abuse and radicalization.

Mildred Nzau, a Kenyan youth advocate, said that robust public private partnerships could offer solution to skills and funding gaps that limit the capacity of African youth to realize their potential.

Source

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Kenya calls for youth empowerment to spur Africa’s transformation agenda

African governments are urged to implement affirmative action policies to ensure the youthful population is at the center of the continent’s quest for economic progress alongside social and political renewal.

Kenya in conjunction with multilateral partners is hosting the three-day Africa Youth Conference in Nairobi whose theme is prioritizing investments in African youth within the post-2015 Agenda.

Margaret Kobia, Cabinet Secretary for Youth and Gender Affairs, told delegates, including policymakers and campaigners, that policy incentives coupled with life-long learning and access to capital were key to ensure the young generation is part of Africa’s socio-economic transformation.

“Africa is grappling with a youth bulge that should be harnessed to make a positive contribution to the continent’s envisaged growth and transformation agenda,” Kobia remarked.

“We must scale up best practices to ensure the youth have gainful employment, skills and seed capital required to make them self-reliant and resilient,” she added.

The 2018 Africa Youth Conference sought to spotlight strategic areas that the continent’s youthful population can be actively engaged to promote economic growth, peace, stability and environmental sustainability.

Kobia said that greater participation of the youth is key to modernizing and enhancing the competitiveness of African economies in the era of globalization.

“Our governments should create an enabling environment for the youth to participate in the digital economy that is unleashing the next wave of prosperity in the continent,” said Kobia.

Multilateral institutions have rallied behind concerted efforts by African countries to tackle youth unemployment, skills deficit and social exclusion that poses existential threat to the continent’s stability and progress.

Izeduwa Derex-Briggs, the Eastern and Southern Africa Region Director for UN Women, said that competence-based learning, mentorship and easy access to start-up capital is key to ensuring African youth contribute optimally to the continent’s growth agenda.

“African youth are resilient and can be drivers of change if they have access to requisite skills, technologies, innovations and mentorship,”said Derex-Briggs, adding that growth of social enterprises in Africa is being fueled by the youth.

The International Labor Organization says that 3 in every 5 unemployed people in Sub-Saharan Africa are youth hence exposing them to poverty and social ills like crime, drug abuse and radicalization.

Mildred Nzau, a Kenyan youth advocate, said that robust public private partnerships could offer solution to skills and funding gaps that limit the capacity of African youth to realize their potential.

Source

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It’s Time To Stop Criticism Our youth

By Osman Abdinasir

A survey done by an Australian NGO revealed that 88 per cent of businesses think the youth today are not adequately prepared for the workplace.

Now, our actions are fed by our perception. Many perceive our youth to be rowdy, lazy and untamed, especially if they are from the ghetto.

All hope and any potential for understanding is gone when headlines shout about crime and youth, as if they go hand-in-hand.

But is this really true? Well, to understand the youth better and know if our assumptions are true, I asked my friends in Eastleigh what they value, what is important to them and what’s not.

Relationships with family and friends are a top priority to youth. We care about our loved ones and also keep in touch [MF1].

The friends, and friends of friends, I know of are based on having common interest and views. Many go beyond race, tribe or even religion. In the youth world, if you are cool you are cool, and your last name is just a tag.

So much is our generation meritocratic that we replace our family name with a cooler version if we want. The hustle is a close second. Every youth wants to make money.

It’s a means to the good life that we all want, young and old. But, I feel like it is the most misunderstood fact about the youth – the assumption that all young people want quick cash, flashy chains and public attention. Many of us want independence.

We want to fend for ourselves and our family rather than relying on handouts. And as most youth discover once they hit adulthood, dependency and expectation are the root of all conflicts.

Respect is my friends’ third big commodity. We want to earn respect, and contrary to popular belief it is only a minority that glorify violence, bullying or being a menace. In my ghetto, staying out of trouble is highly respected as it is viewed to be beating the stereotype.

If you take care of your mom that gets respect. If you do well in school that gets respect and you would earn a nickname like Obama. Getting a decent job is respectable and you would soon be a role model.

If you stay fit and exercise you are cool. Giving back to society makes you a hero. Spiritually, that earns respect because it shows you are ‘awake’ and believe in something greater than yourself.

Not many have the chance to speak and hear from our youth. Criticism comes from a distance, based on a hair style or mode of dressing when we don’t know the person beneath. Judgements are made behind car windows as the daily jam inches past the stream of walking workers from the ghetto.

We are both a product of our society and make up 75 per cent of it so we are worth listening to and taking seriously. If you’ll do that, we’ll take responsibility – it’s a deal.

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