Zimbabweans Unite to Ease Cyclone Idai’s Effects

By Columbus Mavhunga

Zimbabweans have started raising funds and donating goods to provide relief to those who have been affected by Cyclone Idai, which the government says has killed nearly 100 people and displaced hundreds. The government says people are wary of who receives the donations.

At a local church, volunteers arrange donated items destined for places affected by Cyclone Idai in Zimbabwe. Food, water, blankets, clothing – are all found here. The volunteers then load them onto waiting trucks – provided by donors – to head to Zimbabwe’s eastern border where Cyclone Idai ravaged homes and left dozens dead.

One of the volunteers – Johanne Chapungu Oposi – is from the affected region. The 43-year-old man tells me that his former classmate and neighbor – together with the classmate’s wife and three children, were buried alive when a hill collapsed on them while they slept.

“But my elder brother and our family survived, when they saw that that’s what was about to happen they quickly escaped. I want to say that the food supplies there and where to stay are a challenge, or even where to buy food; there is nowhere they can buy because the shops are at the steep slopes so they were destroyed too. I feel quite relieved to be seeing these efforts.”

Tadzi Madzima of the non-governmental organization Ignite Youth says she is happy that Zimbabweans have responded to her calls for people to donate to ease the effects of Cyclone Idai.

“We reached out to the youths in Zimbabwe. We went out mainly on social media where most youths are,” she said. “The response has been overwhelming. We plan to give everything that has been collected here to people affected by Cyclone Idai. We felt that this is the role that we have to play as young people, to help where we can.”

The Red Cross is one of the aid organizations leading efforts to bring relief to Cyclone Idai’s victims. Karikoga Kutadzaushe, the Zimbabwe Red Cross Society operations director, says his organization has deployed teams to ensure that the injured are treated and that there is clean drinking water.

“The situation on the ground is quite dire in that accessibility has been one of the biggest challenges considering Tsinde Eastern is a mountainous area and there have been serious landslides, damaged roads and inaccessibility is one of the worst situations,” he said. “To date, we have almost closer to 100 people who have been confirmed dead, 200 closer to 250 are also currently missing and with regards to people who are currently displaced, we have plus or minus 600 who are actually only currently staying on higher ground within the area.”

Government spokesman Ndavaningi Nick Mangwana told reporters that Harare has deployed army engineers to ensure that damaged roads and bridges are fixed so that assistance can reach the needy. On Zimbabweans responding to calls on social media from organizations and individuals to assist victims of Cyclone Idai, he said:

“It’s good that we have got such goodwill among Zimbabweans; it’s good that we are all running altogether in one accord to help our vulnerable others, our compatriots who are in a bad state at the moment and in a bad place,” he said. “The only thing is we need accountability – we know that in situations like this there is the very fringe minority who will take advantage of the situation…that’s why we say corruption is one of our issues so we hope that there will be systems in place to make sure that whatever is donated, whatever is given ends up at the end user to the point of need where it’s needed most.”

As the truck leaves Harare for Chimanimani and other affected areas, it is hoped the donations reach the intended recipients – those affected by Cyclone Idai. Nancy Kachingwe is among those who donated items.

“The sense of if it was if this happens to me what would I do, you know this happens to families and households so we all have to all understand that, you know, in these days of disasters and climate change, it can happen to anybody; any of us can be next where we end up finding ourselves losing everything, so solidarity has to be part of how we live,” she said

Emergency workers have described flooding spawned by the cyclone as the region’s most destructive in 20 years. Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa visited the affected region Tuesday.

Source VOA News

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Zimbabwe: Key lessons from the Youth Indaba

By Leroy Dzenga

The Zimbabwe National Youth Indaba held last week set a template of what non-partisan conversations can achieve.

Young people came from different spheres to converge and brainstorm, exchange ideas on how they imagine the future of this country to be.

Some thought the turnout was going to be low as the marketing of the event was not as aggressive but on both days the organisers had to make provisional adjustments as the numbers had exceeded projections.

This was testament to the real appetite among youths to take part in critical dialogue that determines their future.

The format of the indaba itself also helped with the retention of ideas from all attendees unlike in the past where the selected speakers would appear, have conversations on their own with youths merely providing an audience for optics.

Minister Youth, Sport, Arts and Recreation Kirsty Coventry should be credited for the break from the ineffective tradition.

Young people were given the responsibility to organise and structure their own event.

Those who were part of the organising team were nominated through an online process, meaning they were also youth chosen.

The two-day conference had panel discussions which attracted top names like Ecocash CEO Natalie Jabangwe, Spidex Media founder Eugene Peters, continentally renowned child education activist Anoziva Marindire, Zimbabwe cricket captain Hamilton Masakadza and musician Tongai “Greatman” Gwaze among other achieving youths.

The panel discussions spoke to issues which have dominated discourse in recent times like Job Creation, Financial Inclusion, Sustainable Entrepreneurship and Critical Skills in the modern Zimbabwe.

Before and after these discussions, all youths in attendance were grouped into breakaway committees according to their areas of interest which ranged from sports, business, mining and other spaces occupied by youths.

The committee`s contributions were incorporated into the panel discussions as talking points, during the panel discussions the audience would ask questions and afterwards reconvene to give feedback to the conversations.

This vigorous process is what culminated into questions which President Emmerson Mnangagwa responded to on the second leg of the Indaba.

Youths had come together to put their event together, agreed on the format and actively participated in the delivery of conversations.

Besides the inclusive conversations which created a sense of ownership among the youths there was also a seed of inspiration that was planted at the event.

Finance and Economic Development Minister Professor Mthuli Ncube took time out of his schedule to share his incredible journey with the young people who were in attendance.

He spoke on the need to include youths in spaces of high level decision making from an early age.

Prof Ncube spoke of how he registered his first company at 23 and sat on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange board at the same age.

He credited the late former Finance Minister Dr Bernard Chidzero for having a youth-oriented approach to leading the economy.

In the same vein, President Mnangagwa walked the youths down the memory lane where he spoke of the struggles they faced studying while battling to liberate this country.

President Mnangagwa implored young people to involve themselves directly in conversations that impact their future and utilise opportunities which would have been availed to them.

“We must not just imagine the future we want but more importantly roll up our sleeves and put our shoulders to the wheel to realise the future we want,” said President Mnangagwa.

The youth make up more than 65 percent of the country`s population and the fact that the national leadership is taking time to connect with their ideas is a positive sign.

Many laid out their ideas, which with adequate support can solve some of the problems faced in Zimbabwe.

For instance, a 28-year-old Harare based engineer Farayi Masendo who is running an innovation turning plastic waste into diesel.

The indaba gave platform to his idea where he interacted with potential collaborators on his project.

Many others had the same opportunity, others even bagged mentorship deals.

What we witnessed at the Indaba was only possible because of the non-partisan nature in which the event was run.

It ran on the principle that all youth are equal and important, an idea which enhanced participation.

There will be a follow-up youth expo in a few months to come, a sign of intent that the indaba was not a talk show.

We wait to see if the follow-up will bear fruit but this is a good start to plugging the gap between policy makers and the youth.

Zimbabwe seems to have begun the journey towards harnessing its youth dividend.

Source Chronicle

Zimbabwe: Let’s make farming attractive to youths

By Sheuneni Kurasha

I welcome you dear reader to this inaugural installment of our weekly column, Farmer’s Diary.

We will be exploring all things farming.

The purpose is to share knowledge and exchange experiences on farming and help each other to be more efficient and productive farmers.

After all, “kugara nhaka kuona dzevamwe” (we become better by observing how others do things).

When I decided to go into commercial farming as a young professional, seven years back, I did not just have the task of convincing my spouse that I was going into a noble business.

I equally had to face a barrage of questions from many of my friends and colleagues who were sceptical if I had made the right decision to consider farming as a business.

Seven years on, my wife has not only supported me, but has also joined in and brought in new perspectives inspired by her engineering background.

This is a story for another day.

It occurred to me that farming was not so “cool” for many of my friends in the late twenties and early forties.

I vividly recall one friend quipping that, “We are really getting old, even one of us is now a farmer.”

It is not surprising that farming either as a career option or business is not a popular option among the youth.

After all, according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), the global average age of farmers is 60-years-old.

This means there are simply not enough young successful farmers to look up to. Farming is typically viewed as a rural venture for old people and one where people go into it as a last resort and often on a subsistence basis.

This brings me to my next point.

In the last seven years, I have been into commercial farming, specialising in pedigree livestock breeding, particularly boran cattle, boer goats and damara sheep, I have witnessed a growing interest among young people aged between 30 and 40 years in venturing into commercial farming.

I now spend hours on end responding to inquiries on our farming Facebook Page, on how young people can break the barriers and go into farming.

We need to realise that if Zimbabwe is ever to address the perennial food-related challenges such as food insecurity, malnutrition, and increasing food prices, in a sustainable manner, there is urgent need to make sure that more and younger people are incentivised to go into farming and remain there.

In my view, the primary duty to ensure that young people are attracted to farming lies with the Government.

There should be immediate and deliberate policy measures and specific programme interventions aimed at making young people view farming as viable and a fashionable career and business option.

This is more imperative considering that Zimbabwe, just like other African countries, has over 60 percent of its whole population below 24-years-old.

In addition, families are also centres of nurturing future farmers and luring them to take farming as a career and business option from an early age.

Hence the saying: farmers beget farmers.

make farming attractive to youths
Let’s make farming attractive to youths
Sheuneni Kurasha
I welcome you dear reader to this inaugural installment of our weekly column, Farmer’s Diary.

We will be exploring all things farming.

The purpose is to share knowledge and exchange experiences on farming and help each other to be more efficient and productive farmers.

After all, “kugara nhaka kuona dzevamwe” (we become better by observing how others do things).

When I decided to go into commercial farming as a young professional, seven years back, I did not just have the task of convincing my spouse that I was going into a noble business.

I equally had to face a barrage of questions from many of my friends and colleagues who were sceptical if I had made the right decision to consider farming as a business.

Seven years on, my wife has not only supported me, but has also joined in and brought in new perspectives inspired by her engineering background.

This is a story for another day.

It occurred to me that farming was not so “cool” for many of my friends in the late twenties and early forties.

I vividly recall one friend quipping that, “We are really getting old, even one of us is now a farmer.”

It is not surprising that farming either as a career option or business is not a popular option among the youth.

After all, according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), the global average age of farmers is 60-years-old.

This means there are simply not enough young successful farmers to look up to. Farming is typically viewed as a rural venture for old people and one where people go into it as a last resort and often on a subsistence basis.

This brings me to my next point.

In the last seven years, I have been into commercial farming, specialising in pedigree livestock breeding, particularly boran cattle, boer goats and damara sheep, I have witnessed a growing interest among young people aged between 30 and 40 years in venturing into commercial farming.

I now spend hours on end responding to inquiries on our farming Facebook Page, on how young people can break the barriers and go into farming.

We need to realise that if Zimbabwe is ever to address the perennial food-related challenges such as food insecurity, malnutrition, and increasing food prices, in a sustainable manner, there is urgent need to make sure that more and younger people are incentivised to go into farming and remain there.

In my view, the primary duty to ensure that young people are attracted to farming lies with the Government.

There should be immediate and deliberate policy measures and specific programme interventions aimed at making young people view farming as viable and a fashionable career and business option.

This is more imperative considering that Zimbabwe, just like other African countries, has over 60 percent of its whole population below 24-years-old.

In addition, families are also centres of nurturing future farmers and luring them to take farming as a career and business option from an early age.

Hence the saying: farmers beget farmers.

One of the major impediments for young people to go into commercial agriculture is cost and, thus, access to farming land. For Zimbabwe, the Land Reform Programme will have failed if it does not include a deliberate policy to promote access to land by young people.

One of the ways in which Zimbabwe and other African countries can harvest on the demographic dividend is through attracting young people into farming and supporting them to become successful farmers.

After all, young people can easily harness technological advancements, including social media tools to enhance their productivity and profitability.

Social media tools facilitate access to information and exchange information, including experiences and existing opportunities.

As the president of the African Development Bank, Akinwumi Adesina observed, the next generation of millionaires and billionaires in Africa will be farmers.

We need to get more young people into farming.

For feedback, kindly get in touch on email: kurashas@gmail.com

Source Sunday Mail

Zimbabwe: MDC Youth leader acquitted


By Mandla Ndlovu


MDC Youth President Happymore Chidziva has been acquitted of charges of inciting public violence by a Gweru magistrate.

Chidziva was being accused of inciting public violence during the pre-election campaign rally in Gweru last year.

He was being represented by his Lawyer, Jeremiah Mutongi Bamu from the Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights.

Chidziva was arrested together with Chamunorwa Madya, the Deputy Secretary-General for the MDC Alliance Youth Assembly and one Mafaiti Mubaiwa. Madya and Mafaiti were charged over the August 1 post-election violence.


Source Bulawayo24


Zimbabwe giants Dynamos call on Cameroon ex-youth in rebuilding exercise


By Michael Madyira


The Zimbabwean giants have endured a trophy-dry spell for the past four seasons

Dynamos will next week assess three players from Cameroon as they move a gear up in their rebuilding exercise.

Former Cameroon youth international midfielder Herve Vincent Mbega, Theodore Landry Tsala and Claude Ngahan Junior are expected in Zimbabwe next week for trials.

Ngahan is also an ex-Cameroon U-20 national striker while Mbega represented Cameroon at the 2011 Fifa Under-20 World Cup.

The Harare giants have gone for the past four seasons without winning the league title after enjoying a dominant run from 2011 to 2014 that saw them claim the league crown in those seasons.

Much emphasis has now been placed on recruiting a striker among the players who will undergo trials. “We are expecting one other striker from Cameroon and the other from Ivory Coast and even if they arrive, it will be a bonus. Otherwise, I think we are comfortable with what we have,” Dynamos coach Lloyd Chigowe told The Herald.

“Last week we had two Ghanaians. One of them is here and the other one I think is now training at CAPS United. We will retain the midfielder, we are impressed with his qualities.

“We are going to propose to the executive that we have a training camp probably in Zambia or in Malawi but it’s all subject to the budget allowing.

“Otherwise if it can’t be done we will find somewhere to camp locally and make sure that we bond away from the glare of the public.”

Dynamos have already signed Congolese striker Ngandu Mangala while they also close to securing the signature of Ghanaian midfielder Robert Saki.


Source Goal.com


Zimbabwe: Mash Central MDC youth leader jailed 6 years


By Simbarashe Sithole/Kenneth Nyangani


MDC Alliance provincial youth chairman for Mashonaland Central, Tonderai Samhu, and four accomplices were on Monday slapped with a six-year jail term each by a Bindura magistrate for barricading roads and burning tyres in Mvurwi during last month’s protests, which were triggered by fuel price hikes.

Samhu (34), together with Wonder Zuze (35), Beverly Mureya (41), Patris Dandajena (34) and Elisha Benjamin (50), had two years of their sentence suspended by magistrate Vongai Guwuriro.

The five were part of the 12 Mvurwi protesters who were arrested last month, while seven others were acquitted due to lack of evidence.

Prosecutor Clement Kuwanda told the court that on January 14, the five mobilised people to gather at Mvurwi Community Hall the following day in protest against the fuel price hikes.

On January 15, the convicts met at Stardic service station in Mvurwi, where they broke into song, beating drums and dancing.

They drew the attention of other Mvurwi residents, who joined in.

The group of about 150 people marched towards Rwizi service station and later to the Mvurwi- Guruve Road, where they blocked the road with stones and worn-out tyres.

Kuwanda said they blocked the intersection of Dawson Road and Birmingham Avenue using the wreckage of a Mercedes-Benz.

They also blocked Harare-Mvurwi and Mvurwi-Mutorashanga highways using council refuse bins, drainage pipes, electricity poles, stones and logs.

They also burnt tyres in the middle of the road, obstructing the free movement of people and threatened to torch vehicles passing by.

Meanwhile, another Mutare protester was yesterday slapped with a three-year jail sentence for barricading roads and burning tyres during the three-day Zimbabwe Congress of Trade Unions-organised stayaway.

Liberty Sithole (30) appeared before provincial magistrate Sekai Chiundura who, however, suspended one year for five years on condition of good behaviour.

It is the State case that on January 15, Joseph Mushati saw smoke in the air near Islamic Church in Dangamvura and went to investigate.

Mushati reportedly saw the convict in the company of others, who are still at large, burning tyres and barricading roads with stones at Boka turn-off, thereby blocking the free flow of traffic.

The informant continued to follow the convict, who continued to barricade roads, before reporting him to police.


Source News Day